the-dawn-is-your-enemy:

steampunkvehicles:

Sigh…. I know WHY they did it, but that doesn’t make it a good idea.

They did it because wheels give you more speed at the cost of requiring an even road. When shit hit the fan, the wheels are jacked up and the threads are engaged. Redundancy is never a bad idea.

That’s not redudancy, it’s obfuscation.  Anything that performs two tasks does each half as well.  Now you’re dependent on wheels that have to carry a tank, but also have to retract?!?!?  That’s going to break on day 1, and now you’re just in a shitty tank. 
There were many, many different attempts to overcome the “tanks are slow” problem- both by the Germans and the Russians- and they all sucked, for this reason.  Flying tanks are horrible tanks and horrible planes.  Amphibious cars are horrible cars and horrible boats.  Floating tanks are horrible boats and horrible tanks.  And the half-track was only invented so that dumb army recruits could be stuck in a tank and given a wheel to turn instead of trying to teach them how to steer a tank.  See a lot of tracked vehicles around with four extra rubber tires?  Don’t think so.  This one goes in the “bad idea” file.  Click on the link to the right for dozens of examples.
Ultimately, the U.S. focused on making their tanks go faster, not

the-dawn-is-your-enemy:

steampunkvehicles:

Sigh…. I know WHY they did it, but that doesn’t make it a good idea.

They did it because wheels give you more speed at the cost of requiring an even road. When shit hit the fan, the wheels are jacked up and the threads are engaged.
Redundancy is never a bad idea.

That’s not redudancy, it’s obfuscation.  Anything that performs two tasks does each half as well.  Now you’re dependent on wheels that have to carry a tank, but also have to retract?!?!?  That’s going to break on day 1, and now you’re just in a shitty tank. 

There were many, many different attempts to overcome the “tanks are slow” problem- both by the Germans and the Russians- and they all sucked, for this reason.  Flying tanks are horrible tanks and horrible planes.  Amphibious cars are horrible cars and horrible boats.  Floating tanks are horrible boats and horrible tanks.  And the half-track was only invented so that dumb army recruits could be stuck in a tank and given a wheel to turn instead of trying to teach them how to steer a tank.  See a lot of tracked vehicles around with four extra rubber tires?  Don’t think so.  This one goes in the “bad idea” file.  Click on the link to the right for dozens of examples.

Ultimately, the U.S. focused on making their tanks go faster, not

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PHOTO
Aug 19
3:36 pm
119 notes
AAACCK!  MY EYES!  THEY BURN!  IT CANNOT BE UNSEEN!!  NOOOOOO!!!!

AAACCK!  MY EYES!  THEY BURN!  IT CANNOT BE UNSEEN!!  NOOOOOO!!!!

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PHOTO
May 21
8:30 pm
50 notes
What’s the worst that could happen?

What’s the worst that could happen?

(Source: sixthland, via ozawatevsuya)

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PHOTO
Apr 18
9:20 pm
571 notes

bassman5911:

Détail d’une phanomobile - 1912 (via French oldies)

(via t-s-k-b)

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PHOTOSET
Mar 26
9:20 pm
115 notes

bassman5911:

Cooley Airship

The story of the airship designed by John F. Cooley is a gem amongst the many oddities of our city’s history. Following the success of the [wikipedia]Wright Brothers in 1903, the world was enthralled by the prospects of flight. People could see tomorrow and wanted it today. This created a market that certain individuals such as Cooley were quick to embrace. He sold a unique vision to the wealthy gentlemen of our city and began construction of his ship in 1910 near the Baker’s Farm area of Genesee Valley Park, where he said the trial flight would eventually take place.

The design was magnificent, beyond the scope of anything that had previously been achieved, surely something to make his investors rich. Cooley’s lofty concept took the form of an 81 foot long and 42 foot wide vehicle requiring both a pilot and engineer to fly. It was billed by a local paper as “the first ‘All Rochester’ plane.”

Construction, however, was never completed. Instead Mr. Cooley disappeared in April, 1911 with outstanding debt. His then unpaid crew in Rochester abandoned their work on the unfinished airship. It was transferred from Cooley’s ownership to a local grocer, through a legal writ of attachment, over the $92 he owed at her store. Cooley eventually resurfaced and was reported to be in New York City selling stock… in an airship enterprise.

The magnificent airship of Rochester and its hangar are said to have been destroyed by a windstorm.

(via Rochester Wiki and Shorpy Historical Photo Archive)

(via puti)


PHOTOSET
Feb 18
8:30 pm
178 notes

Here are a few selections from the wonderful book Victorian Inventions

Dr W.O. Ayers of New Haven in the United States of America has designed a new flying machine so Utopian in conception that serious doubts may well be entertained with regard to its feasibility. Be that as it may, the fact that such a serious publication as the Scientific American has devoted space to this machine in its columns is reason enough for our decision not to deprive our readers of a short discussion of this project.

The propulsive power is derived from compressed air transported in two cylindrical vessels; this air also fills the hollow tubes in the framework of the machine. Compressed to a pressure of 200 atmospheres, the quantity of air conveyed is adequate to drive the machine for several hours.

The Scientific American gives further details: ‘It is possible that the propellors may require to be made larger, but providing the principle is maintained, we consider that a machine such as this can do successfully what is expected of it. In order to afford support for two systems of propellers, one horizontal and one vertical, a table-like frame is required. The dimensions of this are 3 feet by 4 feet while it is supported by four legs 4 feet in height. Quarter-inch-thick steel gives the tubing all the strength needed. The rider, or aeronaut, sits upon a saddle like that of a bicycle, suspended from the top of the frame by steel wires.

The four horizontal propellors serve to give the craft sufficient lifting-power. They are driven not only by the compressed air but also by the lower limbs of the rider thrusting on pedals of the type employed in bicycles. Attached to each cylinder of compressed air is a driving engine in which a paddle-wheel is brought into rotating motion by the flow of air. With his left hand the rider regulates the valve for the air-supply, while with his right arm he drives the vertically revolving propellor which thrusts the machine forward.


Hmm, an air-air-hog. I won’t be signing up for a test ride.

From the same page, an airship with a very smoky traditional-looking steam engine.

See also this video of steam flight:

http://youtu.be/UPEv_M7p4fA

(look, my own experiments in compressed-air bicycling have shown that the torque is there, but not the storage capacity.  You’d have to have a compressed air tank the size of a ship and it would weigh tons)


PHOTOSET
Jan 30
8:30 pm
26 notes
4x4 Willys for sale at Hemmings.  With the machine gun barrel exhaust, bayonet grip, and airplane steering wheel, I wanna like it, but I just can’t.

4x4 Willys for sale at Hemmings.  With the machine gun barrel exhaust, bayonet grip, and airplane steering wheel, I wanna like it, but I just can’t.

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PHOTO
Jan 20
8:30 pm
133 notes
Wow.  This looks like a model, but I can’t imagine a more horrible deathtrap.  Hot, boiling water and steam, meet “gerbiling”.

Wow.  This looks like a model, but I can’t imagine a more horrible deathtrap.  Hot, boiling water and steam, meet “gerbiling”.

(Source: what-the-hell-is-steampunk, via ozawatevsuya)


PHOTO
Dec 30
8:30 pm
466 notes
What could go wrong?

What could go wrong?

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PHOTO
Dec 18
12:00 pm
50 notes
Close but no cigar

Close but no cigar

(Source: circularfire, via searchofweird)

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PHOTO
Oct 24
4:48 am
45 notes

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